#34: We pay artists.|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#3: Entrance to all exhibitions at Kunsthal Gent is free.|#68: Once in a while we need to get out of utopia and get something done.|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#62: Be kind. Full dishwasher: empty it.|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#2: Bring something new to the city of Ghent.|#124: Do less, do it better.|#14: Can you also remain a toddler institution?|#70: Have the office space inside the exhibition space, it reminds of you what you are doing.|#130: Be a uniquely charged and curated gallery that is an artwork in itself.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#4: Pay what you can.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#89: Build-in impurity within the organisation.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#33: We will ensure work by female artists and curators make up at least 50% of our programme each year.|#15: Kunsthal Gent aims to be an extension of public space.|#131: A visitor who comes back after a week might discover new additions to the exhibition.|#81: Things come alive when there is friction.|#82: Clean and sterile looks professional, but really boring.|#34: We pay artists.|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#3: Entrance to all exhibitions at Kunsthal Gent is free.|#68: Once in a while we need to get out of utopia and get something done.|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#62: Be kind. Full dishwasher: empty it.|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#2: Bring something new to the city of Ghent.|#124: Do less, do it better.|#14: Can you also remain a toddler institution?|#70: Have the office space inside the exhibition space, it reminds of you what you are doing.|#130: Be a uniquely charged and curated gallery that is an artwork in itself.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#4: Pay what you can.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#89: Build-in impurity within the organisation.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#33: We will ensure work by female artists and curators make up at least 50% of our programme each year.|#15: Kunsthal Gent aims to be an extension of public space.|#131: A visitor who comes back after a week might discover new additions to the exhibition.|#81: Things come alive when there is friction.|#82: Clean and sterile looks professional, but really boring.|
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05.03.2021 20:00

SYLLABUS - screening and workshop

Pay what you can

The Strike:
Toolkit of social reproduction #1, with Verónica Gago

The Strike – The Power of Not Doing

Toolkit of Social Reproduction # 1, with Verónica Gago (#NiUnaMenos Argentina, Universidad de Buenos Aires)

Organised by Kunsthal Gent (Syllabus Project) and Ghent University (Ghent University Women’s Strike, Centre for Global Studies, Centre for Research on Gender and Culture in collaboration with the Research Centre Gender, Diversity and Intersectionality at VUB)

Free for students.

Programme
  • Strike videoblogs by participating activists and groups: The Debenhams Workers (Ireland), Artist Repeal Campaign (Ireland), Essential Autonomous Struggles Transnational, Solidarity Centre (Georgia), Women’s Strike Assembly (UK), Jesse Jones and Sarah O'Rourke (Ireland), etc.

  • Key Note and Critical Responder by Verónica Gago

As we approach the 8th of March - International Women’s Day – we gather to explore how ‘the strike’ is being used as a feminist and anti-capitalist tool to reorganise and redistribute the work of care and social reproduction in more just and emancipatory ways. What is the potential of the strike in laying bare the global divisions of labour in keeping our families and communities alive and healthy and our workplaces up and running? What kind of work do we need to undo or stop doing during a feminist strike? How do we merge the politics of intersectional feminisms with the tool of the strike? And what kind of work does it take to actually organise a feminist strike?

After watching short video blogs by activist collectives from across the globe who have organised strikes in the realm of social reproduction, Verónica Gago will share her own experiences as one of the key organisers of NiUnaMenos and the Feminist Strike in Argentina. Verónica will also talk about her new book ‘Feminist International: how to change everything’.

This evening is part of a series of events on ‘Tools of Social Reproduction’, that emerged from a workshop with Silvia Federici organised by Kunsthal Gent and Ghent University in October 2020 on how to joyfully and militantly reimagine and rebuild infrastructures of social reproduction in pandemic times. Audio-visual artist Aïlien Reyns made an edit of the 6-hour workshop with Silvia Federici, which will be screened at the start of the evening to spark our imagination on how the strike can serve as an important ‘tool’ or strategy/tactic in our toolkit for social reproduction and community building.

Verónica Gago

Verónica Gago is an organiser in Argentina’s #NiUnaMenos movement (Not One More!), as both a theoretician and an activist. She is also a Professor of Social Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires, Professor at the Instituto de Altos Estudios, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, and Assistant Researcher at the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET). She is the author of Feminist International: how to change everything (Verso Books), Neoliberalism from Below Popular Pragmatics and Baroque Economies (Duke University Press) and Feminist Reading of Debt, co-authored with Luci Cavallero.

Veronica Gago on the Strike
“The tool of the feminist strike maps new forms of the exploitation of bodies and territories from a perspective that is simultaneously that of visibilization and insubordination. The strike reveals the heterogeneous composition of labor in a feminist register, recognizing tasks that have historically been disregarded, showing its current imbrication with generalized precarization and appropriating a traditional tool of struggle to overflow and reinvent it”.

Silvia Federici on Verónica Gago’s Feminist International: how to change everything
“Inspired by the internationally coordinated strike for March 8, Gago has given us a book that brilliantly captures the revolutionary potential of contemporary feminism—its theories, its organizational forms, its struggles—all examined through the lenses of one of the most radical feminist movements on the American continent. It is a courageous and creative book, an ideal read for political formation; it opens new worlds and calls for action.”

image: Geneva Women's Strike Assembly

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