#14: Can you also remain a toddler institution?|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#105: Kunsthal Gent is local in scale, but globally connected.|#91: Embrace doubt.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#21: Live with the exhibition, spend time with it.|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#64: Arrange a distribution of forces.|#26: More artists, less borders.|#6: Demand that visitors are active.|#55: Keep basic human needs on the forefront.|#61: No all male install teams.|#107: Build a community / scene.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#37: Operate with radical transparency.|#87: Always keep in mind there is something really special about being in a room that is 19 meters tall.|#4: Pay what you can.|#137: Use the publication as programming space|#33: We will ensure work by female artists and curators make up at least 50% of our programme each year.|#60: Look after all tools. The moment it looks like things are missing it means that things are missing.|#32: Be pan-gender polyphonic.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#132: Things will always look weird when you’re the first doing it.|#68: Once in a while we need to get out of utopia and get something done.|#39: Be the early stepping stone in an artist’s career|#14: Can you also remain a toddler institution?|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#105: Kunsthal Gent is local in scale, but globally connected.|#91: Embrace doubt.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#21: Live with the exhibition, spend time with it.|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#64: Arrange a distribution of forces.|#26: More artists, less borders.|#6: Demand that visitors are active.|#55: Keep basic human needs on the forefront.|#61: No all male install teams.|#107: Build a community / scene.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#37: Operate with radical transparency.|#87: Always keep in mind there is something really special about being in a room that is 19 meters tall.|#4: Pay what you can.|#137: Use the publication as programming space|#33: We will ensure work by female artists and curators make up at least 50% of our programme each year.|#60: Look after all tools. The moment it looks like things are missing it means that things are missing.|#32: Be pan-gender polyphonic.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#132: Things will always look weird when you’re the first doing it.|#68: Once in a while we need to get out of utopia and get something done.|#39: Be the early stepping stone in an artist’s career|
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23.07.2022 11:00

Filmscreening + discussion (in English)

Pay what you can

Syllabus Summer School Day 3:
Envisioning 'Care' after the Covid19 Pandemic

11.00 - 13.00
Filmscreening,
followed by discussion lead by Barbara Mahlknecht (English)

Marlies Pöschl, Aurore, 2019
FR/AT, 2K video, 21 min, colour, 5.1 sound

María Ruido, Estado de malestar (State of Distress), 2018-2019
Video, 63 min, colour, sound

This event brings together films discussing the contradications and potentials to the organization and infrastructures of care in neoliberal capitalism. María Ruido's State of Distress (2018-2019) reflects on the social conditions of mental health that are experienced as a private one, albeit connected with the burden of job insecurity, eternal uncertainty and extreme individualism.

Marlies Pöschl's semi-documentary science-fiction Aurore (2019) envisions the future of care and the automatization of affect in elderly care. These works, released before the Covid19 pandemic, set a perspective from which to discuss the socio-political framings, challenges and collective learnings in the wake of the Covid19 pandemic.

These works, released before the Covid19 pandemic, set a perspective from which to
discuss the socio-political framings, challenges and collective learnings in the wake of the Covid19 pandemic.

This event is part of the Syllabus Summer School Retreat
Register with an email to danielle@kunsthal.gent

Barbara Mahlknecht is a feminist researcher, curator and art educator. She currently focuses on the histories and potentialities of feminist politics of social reproduction and care.

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