#21: Live with the exhibition, spend time with it.|#117: Consider design, organisational structures and architecture as programme.|#111: Do it together.|#55: Keep basic human needs on the forefront.|#94: No objections? Just do it.|#56: Take a lunch break.|#64: Arrange a distribution of forces.|#4: Pay what you can.|#39: Be the early stepping stone in an artist’s career|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#37: Operate with radical transparency.|#20: Are exhibitions the most suitable form for the art that we present?|#130: Be a uniquely charged and curated gallery that is an artwork in itself.|#137: Use the publication as programming space|#36: We support production separately.|#40: Follow the artist|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#29: We make the program for the artist that we exhibit.|#90: The best systems have a failure or ‘a hole’ in them…|#28: Make Contracts.|#57: Volunteers must be: cared for / hands on / ready to learn / willing to share / in it to win it / show new or old tricks.|#98: The success of it will not lie in the result but in the process.|#24: We invest long-term in individual artists’ careers, working over time in different contexts. This also applies to designers / web-developers / photographers / volunteers /…|#33: We will ensure work by female artists and curators make up at least 50% of our programme each year.|#131: A visitor who comes back after a week might discover new additions to the exhibition.|#32: Be pan-gender polyphonic.|#124: Do less, do it better.|#35: The artist fee should be good.|#53: Immaterial support for artists is important.|#84: The White Cube is a lie.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#89: Build-in impurity within the organisation.|#74: Last one out turns of the lights.|#34: We pay artists.|#81: Things come alive when there is friction.|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#10: Don’t be obsessed with numbers.|#87: Always keep in mind there is something really special about being in a room that is 19 meters tall.|#107: Build a community / scene.|#25: Never ask the artist to just present their work, ask them to co-create and co-organise the space.|#51: How do we invite the true unknown?|#141: Start a Publication Studio at Kunsthal Gent in the nearby future.|#60: Look after all tools. The moment it looks like things are missing it means that things are missing.|#88: Changing internships, artists, curators,... are important propositions to keep a fresh set of eyes.|#16: Kunsthal Gent will always be a construction site.|#15: Kunsthal Gent aims to be an extension of public space.|#44: No name tags at dinner.|#65: No excuses: Thursday morning, team meeting.|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#3: Entrance to all exhibitions at Kunsthal Gent is free.|#5: Kunsthal Gent is a city where different identities collide in an ongoing exhibition without end date. New exhibitions are always a new layer in this ongoing story.|#2: Bring something new to the city of Ghent.|#82: Clean and sterile looks professional, but really boring.|#120: The new type of art institute cannot merely be an art museum as it has been until now, but no museum at all. The new type will be more like a power station, a producer of new energy.|#92: We’re a learning organisation.|#68: Once in a while we need to get out of utopia and get something done.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#132: Things will always look weird when you’re the first doing it.|#119: Be a space of production.|#79: The layered painting in the Old House has the potential to become the emblem to explain what Kunsthal Gent is doing.|#14: Can you also remain a toddler institution?|#105: Kunsthal Gent is local in scale, but globally connected.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#112: Spaces today don’t need to be curated, but occupied.|#91: Embrace doubt.|#6: Demand that visitors are active.|#23: That’s a very interesting piece, but how would it behave in a pizza joint?|#99: Evolve according to changing needs.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#70: Have the office space inside the exhibition space, it reminds of you what you are doing.|#61: No all male install teams.|#26: More artists, less borders.|#62: Don’t be a dick. Full dishwasher: empty it.|#21: Live with the exhibition, spend time with it.|#117: Consider design, organisational structures and architecture as programme.|#111: Do it together.|#55: Keep basic human needs on the forefront.|#94: No objections? Just do it.|#56: Take a lunch break.|#64: Arrange a distribution of forces.|#4: Pay what you can.|#39: Be the early stepping stone in an artist’s career|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#37: Operate with radical transparency.|#20: Are exhibitions the most suitable form for the art that we present?|#130: Be a uniquely charged and curated gallery that is an artwork in itself.|#137: Use the publication as programming space|#36: We support production separately.|#40: Follow the artist|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#29: We make the program for the artist that we exhibit.|#90: The best systems have a failure or ‘a hole’ in them…|#28: Make Contracts.|#57: Volunteers must be: cared for / hands on / ready to learn / willing to share / in it to win it / show new or old tricks.|#98: The success of it will not lie in the result but in the process.|#24: We invest long-term in individual artists’ careers, working over time in different contexts. This also applies to designers / web-developers / photographers / volunteers /…|#33: We will ensure work by female artists and curators make up at least 50% of our programme each year.|#131: A visitor who comes back after a week might discover new additions to the exhibition.|#32: Be pan-gender polyphonic.|#124: Do less, do it better.|#35: The artist fee should be good.|#53: Immaterial support for artists is important.|#84: The White Cube is a lie.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#89: Build-in impurity within the organisation.|#74: Last one out turns of the lights.|#34: We pay artists.|#81: Things come alive when there is friction.|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#10: Don’t be obsessed with numbers.|#87: Always keep in mind there is something really special about being in a room that is 19 meters tall.|#107: Build a community / scene.|#25: Never ask the artist to just present their work, ask them to co-create and co-organise the space.|#51: How do we invite the true unknown?|#141: Start a Publication Studio at Kunsthal Gent in the nearby future.|#60: Look after all tools. The moment it looks like things are missing it means that things are missing.|#88: Changing internships, artists, curators,... are important propositions to keep a fresh set of eyes.|#16: Kunsthal Gent will always be a construction site.|#15: Kunsthal Gent aims to be an extension of public space.|#44: No name tags at dinner.|#65: No excuses: Thursday morning, team meeting.|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#3: Entrance to all exhibitions at Kunsthal Gent is free.|#5: Kunsthal Gent is a city where different identities collide in an ongoing exhibition without end date. New exhibitions are always a new layer in this ongoing story.|#2: Bring something new to the city of Ghent.|#82: Clean and sterile looks professional, but really boring.|#120: The new type of art institute cannot merely be an art museum as it has been until now, but no museum at all. The new type will be more like a power station, a producer of new energy.|#92: We’re a learning organisation.|#68: Once in a while we need to get out of utopia and get something done.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#132: Things will always look weird when you’re the first doing it.|#119: Be a space of production.|#79: The layered painting in the Old House has the potential to become the emblem to explain what Kunsthal Gent is doing.|#14: Can you also remain a toddler institution?|#105: Kunsthal Gent is local in scale, but globally connected.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#112: Spaces today don’t need to be curated, but occupied.|#91: Embrace doubt.|#6: Demand that visitors are active.|#23: That’s a very interesting piece, but how would it behave in a pizza joint?|#99: Evolve according to changing needs.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#70: Have the office space inside the exhibition space, it reminds of you what you are doing.|#61: No all male install teams.|#26: More artists, less borders.|#62: Don’t be a dick. Full dishwasher: empty it.|
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Saddie Choua

Saddie Choua(Brussel) maakt deel uit van het ontwikkelingsprogramma van oktober 2019 tot januari 2020. Haar werk is een kritiek op de exotische, racistische en stereotiepe narratieven over migratie en ‘de ander’ die gangbaar zijn in de hedendaagse media.

Saddie Choua
maakt Kunsthal Gent tot de basis voor haar onderzoek naar pijn en trauma als gevolg van racisme: een onderzoek naar haar eigen pijn, maar ook naar de pijn van anderen. Voortbouwend op haar recente project voor Contour 2019 installeert ze in Kunsthal Gent een 'room of her own': een persoonlijke salon, waar ze een reeks vrouwelijke gasten ontvangt om zo tijdens haar werkperiode een 'spirit of sisterhood' teweeg te brengen. De salon maakt ze samen met de Finse kunstenaar Tuija Asta Järvenpää, met wie ze enkele weken in Kunsthal Gent experimenteert met site, ruimte en situaties om nieuwe ontmoetingen te creëren.

In deze ruimte ontleedt Choua haar eigen trauma rond racisme, in een reeks therapeutische sessies met een vrouwelijke psychologe. Opnames van de sessies vormen de basis voor nieuw werk, ontmoetingen en publieke momenten in de salon.

Een van de gasten is de Turkse sociologe Selen Göbelez - naast sociologe ook een doula of zwangerschaps- en geboortebegeleidster - die werkt aan een doctoraatsonderzoek naar pijn, via narratieven van Turkse vrouwen over geboortes. Samen duiken ze in het verhaal van de in 2009 overleden Turkse sociologe Dicle Koğacıoğlu, die onderzoek deed naar eremoorden in Istanbul en zelfmoord pleegde omdat ze de pijn die ze zag niet meer kon verdragen. Saddie Choua betrekt ook vrouwen uit de Gentse Turkse gemeenschap, met de bedoeling om eerwraak te verbinden met feminicide (moord op vrouwen om wille van hun vrouw-zijn) en bespreekbaar te maken.

Door haar persoonlijke leven in te brengen in haar onderzoek naar pijn als gevolg van racisme, oefent Choua met methoden die het discours over ‘de ander’ kunnen veranderen. Tegelijkertijd is dit project een onderzoek naar HOE je eigenlijk werk kunt maken over de pijn van anderen - want wie maakt uiteindelijk wat over wie?

Over het werk van Saddie Choua

Am I the only one who is like me? is een vraag die kenmerkend is voor het leven en werk van Saddie Choua. Ze problematiseert de positie van de eenzame ik die nooit is losgekoppeld van de ander. Waar zit die ander in de hiërarchie van macht? Waar wordt haar onderdrukking en uitbuiting verzwegen of weggeëxotiseerd? Saddie Choua vraagt ons na te denken over hoe we beelden en dialogen over de ander consumeren en hoe deze ons zelfbeeld en historisch bewustzijn beïnvloeden. Hoe kunnen wij ingrijpen op de beelden die onze geschiedenis schrijven en sociale strijd verzwijgen? Moeten we eerst het geheugen weerleggen om een ander verhaal te vertellen? Of is het weghalen of hercombineren van bepaalde associaties en referenties al voldoende om een andere geschiedenis en zelfbeeld te creëren? Het werk van Saddie Choua kan dan ook gelezen worden als een gefragmenteerd zelf-reflectief visueel essay dat de relatie tussen maker en beeld bevraagt. Hoe blinde vlekken, die net uitnodigen om te vergeten, zichtbaar maken? "Hoe vanuit een subalterne positie anders spreken en verbeelden, of is het net het concept van ‘de ander’ dat mij opsluit in dominante beelden en narratieven?" Saddie Choua doctoreert in de kunsten aan het RITCS in Brussel en werd onlangs genomineerd voor de Belgian Art Prize 2020.

Publieke momenten
> Vrijdag 29 november 2019, 20:00 uur: Saddie Choua: artist talk + film screening
i.s.m. Tuija Asta Järvenpää, WMNS Parliament, Saffina Rana, Yma Sumac, Googoosh & Lina Bo Bardi & film screening: 'Je crois qu’il y a une confusion chez vous. Vous croyez que moi je veux vous imiter. #FatimaMernissi' (2017)

> Vrijdag 13 december 2019
, 20:00 uur:
Videowerk Saddie Choua, onderdeel van de presentatie van The Third Landscape door croxhapox in Kunsthal Gent.

> Vrijdag 28 februari 2020
, 20:00 uur (snacks vanaf 19:00)
Saddie Choua
nodigt de Frans/Turkse sociologe Selen Göbelez en Adriana Thiago (European Network of Migrant Women) uit.
Selen Göbelez
werkt rond het onderzoek naar eerwraak en de zelfmoord van de Turkse sociologe Dicle Koğacıoğlu. Tijdens de avond wordt de film Dicle van Seren Gel vertoond.
Het European Network of Migrant Women (Brussel) is een platform van NGO's onder leiding van vrouwelijke migranten, dat zich in de geest van intersectioneel feminisme inzet voor de rechten van vrouwelijke migranten in Europa.

Beeld: Jean-Pierre Stoop

Saddie choua3 cropped