#98: The success of it will not lie in the result but in the process.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#55: Keep basic human needs on the forefront.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#99: Evolve according to changing needs.|#57: Volunteers must be: cared for / hands on / ready to learn / willing to share / in it to win it / show new or old tricks.|#119: Be a space of production.|#25: Never ask the artist to just present their work, ask them to co-create and co-organise the space.|#70: Have the office space inside the exhibition space, it reminds of you what you are doing.|#61: No all male install teams.|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#28: Make Contracts.|#92: We’re a learning organisation.|#29: We make the program for the artist that we exhibit.|#112: Spaces today don’t need to be curated, but occupied.|#79: The layered painting in the Old House has the potential to become the emblem to explain what Kunsthal Gent is doing.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#74: Last one out turns of the lights.|#5: Kunsthal Gent is a city where different identities collide in an ongoing exhibition without end date. New exhibitions are always a new layer in this ongoing story.|#94: No objections? Just do it.|#26: More artists, less borders.|#60: Look after all tools. The moment it looks like things are missing it means that things are missing.|#88: Changing internships, artists, curators,... are important propositions to keep a fresh set of eyes.|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|#98: The success of it will not lie in the result but in the process.|#30: Don’t work with artists who are assholes.|#55: Keep basic human needs on the forefront.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#99: Evolve according to changing needs.|#57: Volunteers must be: cared for / hands on / ready to learn / willing to share / in it to win it / show new or old tricks.|#119: Be a space of production.|#25: Never ask the artist to just present their work, ask them to co-create and co-organise the space.|#70: Have the office space inside the exhibition space, it reminds of you what you are doing.|#61: No all male install teams.|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#28: Make Contracts.|#92: We’re a learning organisation.|#29: We make the program for the artist that we exhibit.|#112: Spaces today don’t need to be curated, but occupied.|#79: The layered painting in the Old House has the potential to become the emblem to explain what Kunsthal Gent is doing.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#74: Last one out turns of the lights.|#5: Kunsthal Gent is a city where different identities collide in an ongoing exhibition without end date. New exhibitions are always a new layer in this ongoing story.|#94: No objections? Just do it.|#26: More artists, less borders.|#60: Look after all tools. The moment it looks like things are missing it means that things are missing.|#88: Changing internships, artists, curators,... are important propositions to keep a fresh set of eyes.|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#19: Have fun at the exhibition.|
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Opening: 24.05.2019 – 11:00

24.05—∞

Exhibition

Rudy Guedj:
Everything In This World Has Two Handles

Rudy Guedj has been researching the dot and the hole as two opposites to create an image. One is formed through the accumulation of a material while the other is obtained through removal. The hole, thanks to removal of a material, reveals images and spaces. It can do so in life (the peephole for example) but it also has happened in the technological development of photography, with the early form of the pinhole camera or camera obscura. Next to allowing a representation of the outside world by the passing of light through a hole, the camera obscura was used as a device to observe phenomena like solar eclipses indirectly, allowing the study of the event safely since one didn’t need to stare straight at the sun anymore. This is still a very simple way to observe an eclipse nowadays, observing the shadow play created through a perforated sheet of paper.

In his intervention Sunny 16, Looney 11’ made for the windows of Kunsthal Gent, Rudy Guedj aims at turning the exhibitions pace into a gigantic fictional camera obscura from which the projections are already predefined, constantly oscillating between abstraction and figuration to hint at the role pareidolia (the tendency to observe a specific, meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern) can play in relation to our perception of reality and of what might go beyond it. These light projections or apparitions take the surface of the building as a screen, the windows acting like “cameras” of sorts.


Rudy Guedj has been researching various anthropomorphic representations of the Sun and the Moon within medieval, spiritual, alchemical but also secular manuscripts. In astronomy and alchemy the sun is represented by a dot in a circle (a hole)☉, but it can also be represented with a face when “in splendour". In alchemy, the “alchemical marriage” is the merging of the opposites: the Red King and the White Queen or the Sun and the Moon, Gold and Silver, an essential step to achieving perfect balance within the Philosophical Mercury often represented by a serpent like creature. Placing the Moon and the Sun in dialogue on the windows of Kunsthal Gent, Rudy also connects back to his previous work ’Everything In This World Has Two Handles’, added to the Endless Exhibition in May 2019: two snake shaped door handles installed on the glass front doors of Kunsthal Gent.

Rudy Guedj (1988, FR)
With a practice that spans over a variety of mediums ranging from book and exhibition design to drawing, writing or installation, Rudy Guedj (b. 1988, FR) explores the associative processes that often lie behind the construction of narratives. The potential for pareidolia, synchronicity, or analogy in our experience of space is essential to his approach. Often bringing attention to architectural details and glimmering moments of everyday life, his practice explores the role that fiction can play in connecting various types of events, anecdotes, histories.

Next to his work as a graphic designer, he publishes art books under his imprint Building Fictions (BF). BF, sets out to explore ‘building’ as a methodology, with the intent to highlight the potential of storytelling within practices at the intersection of art, design, architecture, literature. While investigating fictional strategies and their potential within artistic production, BF wants to find out where those strategies are at play in the context of real constructions, could those be made of concrete or be more ephemeral, metaphorical, thus anchoring the effects of fictions within the real world.

Rudy Guedj:
Everything In This World Has Two Handles

MDC KH FEB2022 008 LR

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