#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#82: Clean and sterile looks professional, but really boring.|#88: Changing internships, artists, curators,... are important propositions to keep a fresh set of eyes.|#84: The White Cube is a lie.|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#15: Kunsthal Gent aims to be an extension of public space.|#34: We pay artists.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#130: Be a uniquely charged and curated gallery that is an artwork in itself.|#24: We invest long-term in individual artists’ careers, working over time in different contexts. This also applies to designers / web-developers / photographers / volunteers /…|#124: Do less, do it better.|#28: Make Contracts.|#20: Are exhibitions the most suitable form for the art that we present?|#79: The layered painting in the Old House has the potential to become the emblem to explain what Kunsthal Gent is doing.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#81: Things come alive when there is friction.|#6: Demand that visitors are active.|#94: No objections? Just do it.|#35: The artist fee should be good.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#32: Be pan-gender polyphonic.|#65: No excuses: Thursday morning, team meeting.|#37: Operate with radical transparency.|#17: An exhibition is never finished.|#82: Clean and sterile looks professional, but really boring.|#88: Changing internships, artists, curators,... are important propositions to keep a fresh set of eyes.|#84: The White Cube is a lie.|#59: Always protect the floor when painting (or pouring concrete)|#47: Artists need to be supported more than ever in the development of their practice due to the gaps that have been created in the field of fine art|#15: Kunsthal Gent aims to be an extension of public space.|#34: We pay artists.|#54: What about disabled artists?|#130: Be a uniquely charged and curated gallery that is an artwork in itself.|#24: We invest long-term in individual artists’ careers, working over time in different contexts. This also applies to designers / web-developers / photographers / volunteers /…|#124: Do less, do it better.|#28: Make Contracts.|#20: Are exhibitions the most suitable form for the art that we present?|#79: The layered painting in the Old House has the potential to become the emblem to explain what Kunsthal Gent is doing.|#58: Kunsthal Gent is a monument. If you plan to drill a hole, contact Tomas first.|#81: Things come alive when there is friction.|#6: Demand that visitors are active.|#94: No objections? Just do it.|#35: The artist fee should be good.|#127: Remain practical: what happens to the work in an endless exhibition?|#75: A building is a capricious thing: it is inhabited and changed, and its existence is a tale of constant and curious transformation.|#32: Be pan-gender polyphonic.|#65: No excuses: Thursday morning, team meeting.|#37: Operate with radical transparency.|
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. More info

Opening: 18.03.2022 – 20:00

18.03—08.05.2022

Exhibition

Luke Routledge:
Nature Dream Machine

Nature Dream Machine brings together sculptures from a number of Luke Routledge’s recent exhibitions, stitched together alongside new works to present the next chapter of what he calls his living, collage territory. Through this constructed world framework, Routledge’s practice explores the fabric of a fictional multiverse and the fantastical beings that inhabit it.

The title Nature Dream Machine is used to describe the autonomous conceptual device that is now central to Routledge’s artistic practice. The word Nature reflects upon the growth of this ever evolving speculative habitat and the presentation of its territories. Dream Machine is appropriated from the name given to the device created by Beat Generation artists Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs, which generates hallucinogenic visual stimuli to those that encounter it. Brought together the words Nature Dream Machine give a name to the filter of Routledge’s working process.

Through the assembling of this otherverse and its multicolored inhabitants, Routledge presents an untethered reality. A realm of dismantled and reassembled bodies; a place of nonsensical narrative fragmentation, seen through a lens of kaleidoscopic allegory.

Luke Routledge (b.1988) studied BA Fine Art at Loughborough University UK. He works across a range of media including sculpture, painting, animatronics and animation. These various media are employed to detail a fictional landscape and its inhabitants in an ever expanding world building project.

Luke Routledge:
Nature Dream Machine

Screen Shot 2022 03 25 at 15 05 26

EXHIBITION VIEWS
MDC KH Luke Routledge 020 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 021 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 022 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 023 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 024 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 025 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 026 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 001 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 002 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 003 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 004 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 005 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 006 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 007 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 009 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 010 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 011 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 012 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 013 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 014 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 015 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 016 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 017 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 018 LR
MDC KH Luke Routledge 019 LR